Humpback whale Essays & Research Papers

Best Humpback whale Essays

  • Humpback Whales - 1103 Words
    Marine Biology Research Project Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Cetacea Family: Balaenopteridae Common Name: Humpback whale Genus Species: Megaptera Novaeangliae Common Name: Humpback whale Genus Species: Megaptera Novaeangliae General Description: A. Body Symmetry: Bilateral B. Special Pigments or Coloration: Dark grey with lighter underbelly; flippers and flukes are grey and spotted with white C. Habitat: (Zone) Benthic and coastal...
    1,103 Words | 3 Pages
  • Whaling: Humpback Whale and Whales
    Whales have been swimming in the Earth’s oceans for 20 million years; their haunting songs can travel underwater for thousands of miles, they are the largest animals to exist on Earth yet they survive on some of the smallest organisms. A whale’s heart can weigh up to 1,300 pounds, and a baby whale can drink up to 130 gallons of its mother’s milk each day (Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society, 2010). Currently whale hunters claim that they are killing whales for scientific purposes; however,...
    2,137 Words | 6 Pages
  • Humpback Whale and Payne - 611 Words
    In 1971, biologist Roger Payne set out on what would be the first of many trips to Argentina. It was on one of these trips that Payne came across a female white whale and moved in close. "She was asleep," he recalls, "but after a while she opened her eye and looked me over. You would see her eyeball rolling in her head and then she closed her eye again. Basically, the whale was just saying, Well, if you've seen one of us, you've seen them all." Born in 1935 in New York, Payne has been studying...
    611 Words | 2 Pages
  • Whales - 291 Words
    Whale (origin Old English hwæl from Proto-Germanic *hwalaz) is the common name for various marine mammals of the order Cetacea.[1] The term whale sometimes refers to all cetaceans, but more often it excludes dolphins and porpoises, which belong to the suborder Odontoceti (toothed whales). This suborder includes the sperm whale, killer whale, pilot whale, and beluga whale. The other Cetacean suborder, Mysticeti (baleen whales), comprises filter feeders that eat small organisms caught by...
    291 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Humpback whale Essays

  • Conservation of Whales - 559 Words
     Conservation of Chilean Blue Whales Blue Whales are the largest animals on the planet, weighting 200 tons. (World Wildlife Fund) They are very unique and different animals, which are worth to conserve on earth. Blue Whales in Chilean waters are nearly extinct and every time is more difficult for scientists and organizations to keep track of them because there are very few. It is important for people to become conscious about this issue and try to conserve this specie. “Blue Whales are at...
    559 Words | 2 Pages
  • Endangered Whales - 4029 Words
    North Atlantic right whale. Fewer than 350 animals. Given such a small gene pool, scientists fear for its survival. One possible solution may be to reinvigorate the northern whale's genes with those of its more successful southern counterpart off South Africa. Recent reports of pregnant North Atlantic right whales killed by ship strikes off the north-eastern seaboard of the US do not augur well for the species. Fewer than 350 animals Western Pacific grey whale. The most endangered of all great...
    4,029 Words | 15 Pages
  • Blue Whale - 456 Words
    Common Name- Blue Whale Scientific Name- Balaenoptera musculus Family- Balaenopteridae- derived from the French, rorqual meaning whale Related Species- Sei Whale, Humback Whale, Fin Whale, Bryde’s Whale, Eden’s Whale, Common Minke Whale, Antarctic Minke Whale, and Omura’s Whale. Family Traits- Members of the Family Balaenopteridae have a narrow elongated flipper, feed on crustaceans by gulping water and pushing it out through baleen plates, have a dorsal fin and gestation last from 11-12...
    456 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Whale Hunt - 1335 Words
    Envision the Makah nation before white men came to reduce their lands, diminished their way of life, and contaminate them with new diseases. The Makah tribe was once free to roam along the dark sandy beaches of the Olympic Peninsula and experience the fiery glow of the sinking sun creep into the depths of the vast Pacific Ocean. They are no longer able to undergo this majestic cycle in the same tranquility that their ancestors once did. After dealing with the inequities that were brought upon...
    1,335 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Whale Rider - 1377 Words
    Eight-year-old Kahu, a member of the Maori tribe of Whangara, New Zealand, fights to prove her love, her leadership, and her destiny. Her people claim descent from Kahutia Te Rangi, the legendary "whale rider." In every generation since Kahutia, a male heir has inherited the title of chief. But now there is no male heir, and the aging chief is desperate to find a successor. Kahu is his only great-grandchild--and Maori tradition has no use for a girl. But when hundreds of whales beach...
    1,377 Words | 3 Pages
  • Save the Whales - 1228 Words
    Save the Whales Whaling is the hunting of whales, primarily for their large quantities of fat and meat. Its earliest forms date back to 3,000 B.C. (whale facts). Before industrialization and technological advances in fishing technology, a whale’s large size made it a risky and deadly target. Today modern commercial whalers have hunted so many whales that they are responsible for the endangerment and near extinction of many whale species. If we don’t put an effort to stop this now we will surely...
    1,228 Words | 3 Pages
  • Right Whale - 1035 Words
     Right Whale One of the rarest mammals the Right Whale faces near extinction. At about 50 feet long they roam through Atlantic or Pacific waters. “Right whales live in temperate and cool seas in both hemispheres at the surface of the ocean. Southern right whales live at latitudes between 20°-55° but will occasionally venture down to 63°.” (Col). Or some species of Right Whale such as the Black Right Whale may live in all of the oceans. They travel very often but swim at a very low speed...
    1,035 Words | 3 Pages
  • Saving the Whales - 542 Words
    Saving the Whales When I think about the ocean, I think about all the animals that live in it, including the whales. Whale hunting has been going on for decades. These huge ships go out into the sea and capture whales; they claim they are capturing them for research. What kind of research exactly? I do not know. One article I read on the issue said that the whales used for the research end up being a meal more times than not. In other words, they capture the whales, do their “research” and...
    542 Words | 2 Pages
  • Killing Whale - 637 Words
    Intentions of Whale in Killing Are Debated By DAMIEN CAVE MIAMI — Homicide investigators in Orlando said Thursday that the death of a trainer at SeaWorld on Wednesday occurred when the theme park’s largest male Orca whale grabbed the trainer by her hair while she stood in shallow water, and dragged her into a deep pool. Within minutes, the trainer, Dawn Brancheau, 40, was dead from drowning and what the police described as “multiple traumatic injuries.” There were no signs of foul...
    637 Words | 3 Pages
  • Beluga whales - 338 Words
    Beluga whales Beluga whales, also known as white whales, are usually easy to spot for their unique color. Beluga whales are born gray or even brown then fade out to their natural color of white. Beluga whales travel in small groups known as pods. White whales are very social, and communicate in different such as, whistles, clicks, and clangs. The white whale can also mimic noises. In the around the late 1920’s to the early 1940’s people started whaling, for it became one of their...
    338 Words | 1 Page
  • The Evolution of Whales - 925 Words
     The Evolution of Whales “Their tongues alone can weigh as much as an elephant and their hearts as much as a car.” The animal called whales what are the largest, intelligent and aquatic mammals. However, whales were not the aquatic animals at the beginning. After thousands of years of evolution, since changes in the terrestrial environment and the demand for food, the whales become appearance like a graceful arc from the four limbs. We have to imagine that what happened in the past...
    925 Words | 3 Pages
  • Speech Outline on Blue Whales
    We Are Living with Giants Introduction: If you ever saw Jurassic Park you know how big dinosaurs could be. As a kid I used to love dinosaurs. For a while I wished that the movie was real. I just wanted to see how majestic it would be to see the biggest creatures that ever lived. But then I found out that Dinosaurs are not the biggest creatures to roam this earth. I found out that the biggest creatures to live on this planet are still alive and that I actually did see one. I found out that the...
    773 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mass Killing of Dolphin and Whales
    Mass killing of dolphin and whales A recent article in The Jakarta Post, ”Mass killing of animals and Asian values”, concern the slaughter of dolphin in Japan and China. The Author, Mario Rustan, tell us the information about whaling industry and dependability slaughtering of whale with the Japanese and Chinese value. I totally agree with the author’s opinion because the killings of wild rare animal can risk the nature balance for the future although have a base of honor, wealth and...
    554 Words | 2 Pages
  • Persuasion Against Whale Hunting
    Save Our Whales: End Whale Hunting April 7, 2011 Save our Whales, End Whale Hunting Whales, often called “the Ocean’s gentle giant” are one of the biggest species/mammals that spend their entire life in the ocean. The smallest known whale is the “Minke” which, by adulthood is only 8.5 feet long; the largest known whale is the “Blue whale”, which measures 94.5 feet long. Since the ancient times, people have written about encounters with this mammal. Ancient Roman and Greek...
    2,372 Words | 7 Pages
  • Whale Rider Chapter Questions
    The Whale Rider Chapter Questions Chapters 1-6 1. Chapter 1 begins in myth, and myths explain what was once unexplainable to a people. What does the myth of the whale rider explain to the Maori people? 2. Chapter 2 gives us the point of view of the whales. The bull whale remembers his master, the "golden man." Do you think that the whale is as old as the myth, or do you think that the whale draws on the collective memory of his culture? Or, do you have another idea? Give...
    563 Words | 3 Pages
  • Whale Wars Essay - 655 Words
    Matthew 3/3/2013 The Whale Wars Every December, a fleet of hungry, evil whaling vessels set sail from Japan to commence their annual hunt on the minke and humpback whales in the Antarctic Whale Sanctuary in the Southern Ocean. At the same time there is a crew of passionate volunteers making ready their vessels to make the same journey to the Southern Ocean, but they are not going there to whale. They are going there to do whatever is necessary to make sure Japan does not kill any...
    655 Words | 2 Pages
  • Detecting Whale Meat Using DNA
    Detecting Whale Meat Using DNA Marine Science Mrs. Peachy RuthAnn Jackson 3/12/2015 The first part of the article is all about the effort to stop whaling and how they have come up with a new way of tracing the import/export of whale meat. Then they start talking about how the governments and Japan and Norway have been actively resistant to efforts to inspect their markets and do the testing. Then it is said that some of the other countries think the band on Japan and Norway should be lifted so...
    283 Words | 1 Page
  • Why Whale Hunting should be banned
    Why whale hunting should be banned. Whale hunting or whaling is hunting whales for commercial use, to get oil, food, or be used for scientific studies. Whaling has been going on for thousands of years, originally whales where killed for food but more recently they have been hunted for more industrial purposes like the liver for oil or using whale teeth for buttons and jewellery. Whale oil is even can even be used for alcohol, soap and even lipstick. After World War 2, Japan had a shortage of...
    544 Words | 2 Pages
  • Summary of Brian Doyle’s “Joyas Volardoras”
    Summary of Brian Doyle’s “Joyas Volardoras” Brian Doyle focuses on how a heart is mesmerizing in various ways in his essay “Joyas Volardoras.” However, he also shows that a heart is vulnerable to the simplest things in everyday life. He expresses both of these points by having a different outlook on the hearts of hummingbirds, whales, and humans. Doyle informs us that a hummingbird’s heart is small in size but it is full of strength. Their heart allows them to fly hundreds of miles nonstop...
    540 Words | 2 Pages
  • Kitagawa Senior Thesis Libre
    Japanese Whaling and International Law 日本の捕鯨と国際法 KITAGAWA, Mami 北川茉美 091465 March, 2009 Japanese Whaling and International Law 日本の捕鯨と国際関係 付和文抄訳 A Thesis presented to the Faculty of the International Christian University for the Baccalaureate Degree 国際基督教大学教授会提出学士論文 by KITAGAWA, Mami 北川茉美 091465 March, 2009 Approved by ________________________ Professor SCHOENBAUM, Thomas J. Thesis Advisor 論文指導審査教授 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction: General feature of the whaling issue・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 1 Chapter...
    12,883 Words | 37 Pages
  • Descriptive Paper - 672 Words
    Maui, Hawaii If I could go anywhere in the world on a dream vacation, Maui “The Magic Isle” of Hawaii, would most certainly be the place I would choose. The thought of lying on the silk-felt beaches in the blazing sun on the world’s known “Best Island” gives me all the desire to go to Maui, Hawaii. Not only do the heavenly beaches grab my attention, but also the breathtaking scenery Maui offers along with all the finest sights and attractions waiting to be explored. Maui definitely resembles...
    672 Words | 2 Pages
  • anti whaling - 514 Words
    Why Whaling should be banned, by Annabel Lees Imagine yourself as a Minke Whale being chased by a whaling vessel in the Antarctic Ocean. After half an hour, BAM! A harpoon hits you. Instantly you feel an agonizing pain in your side. You still fight for another hour until you feel weak, as if you cant move one more muscle in your body, you start to slow down and give up. Then the whalers shoot you with a shotgun, until you die. Every year this happens to over...
    514 Words | 2 Pages
  • Animal Communication - 912 Words
    Animal Communication: Whales vs Elephants Unlike humans, animals do not have a complex language system, but they do in fact have their own means of communication. Their main purpose is for survival and some may not even be aware they are doing it. The two mammals I chose to compare are whales and elephants and their reasons for communicating and channels of communication. Some reasons for communicating may include procreation, dominance and territorial rights, food, and alarms. Channels of...
    912 Words | 3 Pages
  • Whaling Essay (Argumentative) - 667 Words
    Akane Shimasaki Writing Mr. Tan 03­09­14 “Japan’s annual whaling program should be banned.” 31,984 whales have been killed since the IWC moratorium. 31,984 whales were killed for “scientific research”, only so more can be killed for commercial use in the future. The IWC moratorium was created in order to “provide for the proper conservation of whale stocks”.I believe that this sort of system is not correct, and that Japan’s annual whaling program should be banned....
    667 Words | 1 Page
  • A Brief History of Antarctic Whaling
    The introduction of the factory ships into the fleets of existing commercial whaling operations in 1925 brought with it increased catches of predominantly blue whales due to their large size and yield of whale oil derived from the blubber that insulates whales in the cold seas. It is worth noting that humpback whales were also caught as they were slower swimmers and easier to catch, as the humpback whales were often found close to the coast. They were then often towed back to land-based...
    976 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Best Tour I've Ever Had
    As a 11 years old kid, I have had many vacations before. Those vacations include trips to Spain, Australia, Canada, Japan, Korea and many other places. Pictures of volcanoes, oceans, islands were taken. Each of them represents an amazing vacation that I had. However, none of them can be compared to the “Winter” vacation, the one to Alaska by cruise. This trip left me a fantastic memory. I favor the vacation to Alaska. We had a chance to watch the whales in the ocean. I had desired to watch...
    417 Words | 2 Pages
  • Illegal Commercial Whaling - 1143 Words
    Commercial Whaling Countless amounts of great whales will be illegally caught and slaughtered for commercial sale and “scientific” research this year. In spite of a worldwide moratorium, put in place by the International Whaling Commission twenty four years ago banning the act of commercial whaling, three defiant countries continue to hunt whales illegally. If these countries hunt whales against the law and continue to get away with minimal consequence it may encourage other countries to...
    1,143 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Heart of “Joyas Voladoras” - 1295 Words
    Bethany Davis First Year Writing September 27, 2012 The Heart of “Joyas Voladoras” “In our time together, you claimed a special place in my heart, one I’ll carry with me forever and that no one could ever replace.”-Nicholas Sparks (Dear John). The heart is a very abstruse thing. Scientifically, know the differences between a human’s heart and a dog’s heart. They know how many hearts a worm has and how a bacterium has none. Doctors know how to perform surgery...
    1,295 Words | 4 Pages
  • Anti-Whaling - 689 Words
    A parable tells of three blind men confronted by an elephant. One touches the leg, and concludes the elephant is built like a tree. The next grasps the trunk and believes the elephant to be a giant snake. The third strokes the side, and describes a solid wall. A parallel exists here with the controversy over commercial whaling. No matter how long or hard proponents and opponents debate the subject, they never seem to be looking at the same animal. There are, of course, several aspects which...
    689 Words | 2 Pages
  • Makah and Whaling - 2207 Words
    Makah and Whaling Introduction During the past 30 years the whales gradually became the center of public attention and sympathy. Tourists watching the whales off the eastern coast of the United States and in the lagoons of California, were struck by their remarkable nature and behavior. At the same time, the number of most large whales continued to decline. Certainly whale hunting was rather indiscriminate since the Middle Ages, reaching a point where these mammals were in imminent danger...
    2,207 Words | 6 Pages
  • GEOG1016 Topic5 Fishery 2015 Handout Colour 20150212
    GEOG1016 Nature Conservation for Sustainable Societies Guidelines on the use of the pdf files of lecture handouts: (1) The files shall only be used by registered students of the course for learning purpose only. (2) The files must not be transmitted in any form to any third parties who are not registered students of the course. (3) The copyrights of all the texts and illustrations in the files must be strictly observed, and they must not be copied or used in any way outside the realm of ...
    4,423 Words | 47 Pages
  • Commercial Whaling - 856 Words
    If Commercial Whaling Was Reinstated What Effects Would It Have On The Environment? The history of commercial whaling is a long dark period in our time. It is full of the bloodshed of many innocent creatures. When commercial whaling started in 1910 the average numbers of whales killed per year were around 12,000. Then 30 years later the number jumped to 40,000. This was decimating to the whale populations, some near the brink of extinction. Then in 1946 the IWC (International Whaling...
    856 Words | 3 Pages
  • Creative Writing: Past and Present Tense
    Seasons of flourish waves In the sizzling summer the long beach waves appear inviting. Smooth sand firstly greets us with their wild sense of heat. As near the view and sound of waves rumbling along the sea starts our excitement. The weather is perfect. Some people dive into the chill relaxing water like a family of dolphins, as others sunbath along us being like a group of lazy walruses resting. The atmosphere is comforting. Out beyond the heavy waves. I can see the three mystery islands...
    312 Words | 1 Page
  • Whaling - 369 Words
    Research Paper Outline- Japanese Whaling: Legitimate Research or Inhumane Brutality? Thesis Statement: In order to prevent the permanent extinction of all whales in our future, we need to increase our knowledge about current whaling practices, and continue to vigorously fight against it until whaling has diminished. I. INTRODUCTION: We must put an end to whaling now II. Background information A. In 1986, the International Whaling Commission (WIC) enacted a moratorium on all...
    369 Words | 2 Pages
  • Commercial Whaling - 521 Words
    Commercial whaling is not a very common controversy every one knows about but it really should be. There are a few main reasons whaling needs to be enforced more and those are Most whale species have a very few amount of them left in the wild, the way the hunters kill the whales is cruel, and it is already illegal but people choose to break the law. The first reason whaling needs to be stopped permanently is that most whales have a very low number of them. Minke whales are the most hunted...
    521 Words | 2 Pages
  • Example of a Speech Outline - 648 Words
    WHALING: THE MASSACARE OF THE SEA’S GIANTS Specific Purpose: To inform my audience about the decreasing number of whales and the reasons why they are hunted down. Central Idea: Whales are declining in numbers as there are commercial reasons that explain why they are hunted down: their blubber, meat and bones. Introduction I. ‘Whale Wars’. A. Ever heard of it? B. If you haven’t, it is a documentary about a group of very brave and concerned conservationists called ‘The Sea...
    648 Words | 2 Pages
  • Should Whaling Be Banned Completely
    Should whaling activities be banned completely? Whales are the largest animals on earth. It has existed for over millions of years. They are also the largest mammals on the planet. Although they all look alike, there are many species of whales. Each time, they will only produce one offspring. According to Whale World, female whales only produce a baby whale each year, for they need to take care of the baby for the whole year (Whale World, n.d). They are gentle animals with graceful movements...
    2,050 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Cruel Methods of the Whaling Industry
    Whales do not threaten fish populations, and now that we have alternatives to whale products, killing them doesn't create the money it used to. It is now more important to save them and let whale tourism to create the money. "Research whaling" is only a bad excuse to continue killing them. The Decreased Numbers Bones, Relic of Whaling Industry, Port Lockroy, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, Polar Regions Poster by AllPosters. Click on thumbnail to buy This is the argument against...
    613 Words | 2 Pages
  • Joyas Voladoras - 1035 Words
    Consider the hummingbird for a long moment. A hummingbird’s heart beats ten times a second. A hummingbird’s heart is the size of a pencil eraser. A hummingbird’s heart is a lot of the hummingbird. Joyas volardores, flying jewels, the first white explorers in the Americas called them, and the white men had never seen such creatures, for hummingbirds came into the world only in the Americas, nowhere else in the universe, more than three hundred species of them whirring and zooming and nectaring...
    1,035 Words | 3 Pages
  • International Whaling Committee - 1091 Words
    The International Whaling Committee(ICW) is an IGO that was created in 1946 by the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling. The IWC was created to ensure conservation of whale stocks and development of the whaling industry. The IWC presently has 40 members, with membership open to any state willing to sign on to the ICRW. The IWC meets annually; it has a small Secretariat and is lead by the Secretary-General. It is further divided into three committees: the Scientific, Technical,...
    1,091 Words | 3 Pages
  • English Exposition Whaling English
    English Exposition Whale hunting must be stopped! Imagine your swimming in the ocean, minding your own business. Then, suddenly, something sharp hits you. It enters your body and explodes. The pain is killing but it does not kill you, not yet. Again a sharp object hits you and explodes. Again and again you are hit. Your enormous body, however, does not give up that easily. It will take more than a half an hour to get unconscious. Maybe, if you are lucky, you will drown. Perhaps you will be...
    1,011 Words | 3 Pages
  • Why Whaling Should Be Banned
    Why Whaling Should Be Banned * Whales have been hunted by humans for their meet, bones and blubber. * Whaling, during the 19th century, wiped out most of the world's whale populations. * Whales grow and breed slowly; numbers will take a long time to recover. This means that they will more easily become more extinct. Information * The International Whaling Commission (IWC) banned whaling in 1986. * There are some countries that issue permits to kill whales for research;...
    715 Words | 3 Pages
  • Whaling - 501 Words
    TEXT A Put an end to the cruelty of whaling Whales face more threats today than at any other time in history. Commercial whaling has been banned for more than two decades yet Japan, Iceland and Norway continue firing harpoons into these gentle creatures for products that nobody needs. More than 30,000 whales have been killed for commercial purposes since the ban on whaling in 1986. After hundreds of years of exploitation, whale populations remain at risk from hunting, ship strikes,...
    501 Words | 2 Pages
  • Acct Project 2 - 1928 Words
    Executive summary: Whale fishing, also known as whaling, is a traditional fishing activity which existing thousands of years in the world. Fisherman fishing whales, sell of whale meat and oil to make money. With the development of modern fishing technology, industrial fishing gradually replaces a large number of private fishing activities, which made whaling easier and more efficient. Greenpeace International’s data showed “Commercial whaling during the last century decimated most of the...
    1,928 Words | 6 Pages
  • banning whaling - 1154 Words
    Professor Subhamitra Adhikari Academic Writing B 13 December 2013 Banning whale hunting Whales are the biggest animals that live on this planet, in the oceans. Depending on their species they can weigh up to 200 tons, the weight of around 12 elephants or 2000 people. It has also been studied that the brains of whales are developed which means they are intelligent creatures. Since centuries whales have been hunted down for their oil and meat. The process of killing whales...
    1,154 Words | 4 Pages
  • Review of Joyas Volardoras: An Essay by Brian Doyle
    Brian Doyle focuses on how a heart is mesmerizing in various ways in his essay “Joyas Volardoras.” However, he also shows that a heart is vulnerable to the simplest things in everyday life. He expresses both of these points by having a different outlook on the hearts of hummingbirds, whales, and humans. Doyle informs us that a hummingbird’s heart is small in size but it is full of strength. Their heart allows them to fly hundreds of miles nonstop and dive sixty miles an hour. Hummingbirds also...
    320 Words | 1 Page
  • The Detrimental Effect of Killing and Capturing Marine Animals
    The Detrimental Effect of Killing and Capturing Marine Animals Alex Maldwin Winneconne High School AP English Language and Composition April 5, 2013 Abstract This paper explores disadvantages of detrimental killing and capturing of marine animals. It also discusses ways to stop and decrease the killing and capturing of marine animals and the effects on marine species from keeping them in captivity for people’s entertainment. The disadvantages of killing and capturing marine animals...
    3,098 Words | 7 Pages
  • Green Peace Essay - 1322 Words
    How Greenpeace has made a difference in the world. First of all, what is Greenpeace? It’s an organization of hundreds of thousands of people who all came together for one cause, making the world a better place. They face new issues every day and push people to new limits to make sure we find justice for what we stand up for and believe in. “ Greenpeace began by hiring one battered boat and now owns a sophisticated fleet of ocean-going vessels and river crafts. It began by opposing one...
    1,322 Words | 4 Pages
  • Japanese Whaling - 1319 Words
    As early as the 12th Century though to the 20th century, Japan has been involved in the hunting and slaughtering of whales for food and other produce. Japan can trace their whaling history back hundreds of years, to when whales were driven into nets, harpooned repeatedly and then dispatched with either a long sword or a wooden plug driven into the blowhole. Dating as far back as 10,000 B.C. indicate that even hand held harpoons were used for whaling in Japan. Japans Methods were not as humane as...
    1,319 Words | 4 Pages
  • Whaling - 1304 Words
    Whaling Whaling is the hunting of whales and it is one of the big issues in the world. Japan is one of the pro-whaling countries and a majority of the Western countries are objecting to Japan. However, this essay would like to insist that whaling is a part of the Japanese rural traditional culture, so it is important for some Japanese people. Therefore, the essay support the idea that whale hunting should not be prohibited. This essay aims to tell people who do not know about Japanese whaling...
    1,304 Words | 4 Pages
  • Animals in Danger - 1576 Words
    List Of Animals In Danger | Addax | African Elephant | African Lion | American Marten | Animals In Danger | Arabian Oryx | Asian Otter | Bald Eagle | Black Rhinoceros | Blue & Yellow Macaw | Bottlenose Dolphin | Brazilian Tapir | Bridled Nailtail Wallaby | Brown Grizzly Bear | California Condor | Cassowary | Cheetah | Commersons Dolphin | Corncrake | Dalmatia Pelican | Dugong | Eastern Cougar | Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake | European Otter | Fresh Water Crocodile...
    1,576 Words | 8 Pages
  • Case Analyses - 593 Words
    PREFER RATHER WEK The case describes strategic change to deal with a set of challenges faced by Ann Brengle, the Executive Director of the New Bedford Whaling Museum. Beginning with a revenue shortfall following September 11, 2001, Brengle streamlined operations and cut costs. The case provides information on the community of New Bedford, MA, an economically depressed area increasingly dependent on tourism, as describes Brengle’s tussles with the local press, local authorities, and her own...
    593 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Whaling Ban Should Not Be Lifted
    The Whaling Ban Should Not Be Lifted In this essay, I will argue that Japan and Norway should not continue whaling and trading in whale meat. Each year, Japan kills around 700 whales for what it claims is research, while the meat is being sold in restaurants and shops. If there are to be whales at all for future generations to enjoy, then this excessive whaling has got to stop. Not only is Japan over-whaling, it is importing cheaper whale meat from Norway because of its cheaper prices. The...
    336 Words | 1 Page
  • To What Extent Can the Whaling Practice in Japan Be Justified?
    The International Whaling Commission (IWC) is a worldwide organisation accountable for regulations on whaling. Under the guidance of this organisation, its member countries meet annually on a regular basis and discuss issues regarding whaling (IWC 2011). After long-term discussions, Japan’s whaling practices have been restricted, and Japan is currently only allowed to perform whaling in the name of research in the northwestern Pacific and the Antarctic. (Morikawa 2009:5). Since this commercial...
    2,215 Words | 6 Pages
  • Me, Myself, and I
    To: Steve Stone Date: Oct. 1, 2008 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Region 1201 NE Lloyd Blvd., Suite 1100 Portland, OR 97232 From: Wren Lynberg Re: Makah Request for Waiver of MMPA Moratorium Dear Mr. Stone, After carefully reviewing the available background information on the Makah Indian Tribe’s request for a waiver of the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) moratorium against hunting of gray whales, I believe that the waiver by the Makah...
    771 Words | 3 Pages
  • Brian Doyle 'Joyas Volardores' analysis
     Brian Doyle’s work, Joyas Voladoras, is about humming birds, a whale, worms, and a cat dragging itself into the forest to die. He uses a lot of metaphors and anthropomorphism in his style to grab your attention. By describing the life we live and how we love, Doyle compares and contrasts differences and similarities between the Hummingbird, Tortoise, Blue whale, small insects and humans. He talks about love and emotion, insecurities and loneliness, and childhood memories. Doyle emphasizes...
    1,021 Words | 3 Pages
  • Globalization Influences on Modern Society
    Globalization Influences on Modern Society Globalization is killing the globe. Globalization is a way of interaction between the people, transnational agencies, organizations, and governments of different nations. Globalization is not new. Thousands of years ago, people began commercial activity between lands separate by vast distances. The Silk Road was the most famous line that brought music, culture, ideas, foods and routes connecting East and West. Fischer’s article “Globalization...
    2,371 Words | 7 Pages
  • Round River by Aldo Leopold
    In the essay the "Round River" Aldo Leopold was trying to say many different ideas that related together in the fight for nature preservation and restoration. One of Aldo Leopolds main points in his essay was that we as humans can not replace, rebuild nature. So before it goes to far, and get's to destroyed we must restore it. As people though we can only do so much and we can't restore it with foreign plants, but only the natural plants that originated there. So if we destroy an area's...
    490 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sounds Study - 636 Words
    What is the biggest animal ever to exist on Earth? By considerable measure, the largest known animal on Earth is the blue whale. Mature bluewhales can measure anywhere from 75 feet (23 m) to 100 feet (30.5 m) from head to tail, and can weigh as much as 150 tons (136 metric tons). That's as long as an 8- to 10-story building and as heavy as about 112 adult male giraffes! These days, most adult blue whales are only 75 to 80 feet long; whalers hunted down most of the super giants. Female blue...
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  • Why Wahling Should Be Stopped
    Whaling is the killing or hunting of whales mainly there for meat and oil. Its earliest forms date to at least 3000 BC. Industrial whaling emerged with organized fleets in the 17th century; competitive national whaling industries in the 18th and 19th centuries; and the introduction of factory ships along with the concept of whale harvesting in the first half of the 20th century. As technology increased and the need for the resources stood high, catches increased highly by the sustainable...
    440 Words | 2 Pages
  • Animal Classification - 1102 Words
    Animal Classification 1 Animal Classification Karen Fowler SCI/230 Karen Andarko November 19,2011 Animal Classification 2 Metazoa is another name for Kingdom Animalia. This kingdom does not contain prokaryotes or the potists and all members are multi-cellular and are heterotrophs. They mostly ingest their food and digest it into an internal...
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  • Whaling - 1570 Words
    Don’t Whale About It. Do Something. Whaling first began in 5000 B.C. but was only practiced in moderation for useful reasons such as cooking materials and food (“Whaling”). Today the practice of whaling, different from the past, has drastically changed and has become an industry without much oversight or concern for the damaging effects that whaling has on our world. Many organizations as well as countries who are against whaling have been actively trying to stop this terrible practice for...
    1,570 Words | 4 Pages
  • Stop Whaling - 837 Words
    Stop Whale Hunting Stop Whale Hunting IWC (International Whaling Commission) banned the commercial whaling in 1986. The main reason is with the increase of human and hunting technology, the speed of catching these whale exceed the sustainable stock of whales. Although IWC had already come out such a clear policy, some pro-whaling countries are still doing the whale hunting----for scientific research. Since 1930, with the increase of human demand and technology, human beings are putting...
    837 Words | 2 Pages
  • Whaling Should Be Banned
    Whaling is the hunting of whales mainly for meat and oil. Its earliest forms date to at least 3000 BC.[1] Various coastal communities have long histories of sustenance whaling and harvesting beached whales. Industrial whaling emerged with organized fleets in the 17th century; competitive national whaling industries in the 18th and 19th centuries; and the introduction of factory ships along with the concept of whale harvesting in the first half of the 20th century. As technology increased and...
    340 Words | 1 Page
  • Paikea’s Determination to Become the Chief
    Paikea’s Determination to Become the Chief Whale Rider by Niki Caro is a story about a 12 year old girl who is the true heir to be chief of the tribe but her grandfather, following Maori traditions, believes that the role of chief is to be the first born son of the chief only. Throughout the movie, Paikea is determined to prove that she is the true heir and can be the chief of the tribe. This movie shows how she struggles to get her grandfather’s approval due to his beliefs and the tribe’s...
    767 Words | 2 Pages
  • Whaling - 338 Words
    Whaling Against- Dear Editor, I am writing to tell you that I disagree very strongly about the whole topic of whaling, I think that it should stop at once because of the amount we are killing is unbelievable, and I would hate to say it but if we keep on going at this rate, there is a chance that the whale could face extinction, I only found out the other day that there are an estimated 5000 whales killed every year. Firstly once you have killed a whale it takes a longer time to...
    338 Words | 1 Page
  • Effect of Sealers and Whalers to Maori Culture
    Whales have an important place in Māori tradition. Several tribes tell of the arrival of their ancestor, Paikea, on the back of a whale. Although there is debate as to whether Māori hunted whales, it is clear they regarded stranded whales as a valuable source of meat, and used whale teeth and bones for ornament. Ship-based whaling Māori men were eager recruits for whaling ships, as replacements for crew who had deserted; whaling was exciting and an opportunity to see the world. As early...
    464 Words | 2 Pages
  • Moby Dick - 628 Words
    In the novel “Moby Dick” by Herman Melville, a story describes a character named Ishmael and his dreams of going on a whaling boat to see the world from a different view. One of the most memorable scene of this novel was the ending in which we were able to visualize Captain Ahab jump of the boat to try his best to kill the white wale know as Moby Dick. It was a very gruesome scene that portrayed Ahab jump onto Moby Dick with a harpoon, stabbing him as best he could trying to end the whales life...
    628 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why Do Rabbits Have Long Ears
    Whale (origin Old English hwael)[2] is the common name for any large marine mammal of the order Cetacea, which have forelimbs modified as fins, a tail with horizontal flukes, and nasal openings on top of the head.[2] The term whale is sometimes used to refer to all cetaceans, but in more common usage it generally excludes those members of the Delphinoidea superfamily which are known as dolphins and porpoises.[3] These smaller species belong to the suborder Odontoceti (toothed whales), which also...
    262 Words | 1 Page
  • Whaleship Essex - 265 Words
    Book Review: In the heart of sea: the tragedy of the whaleship Essex, written by Nathaniel Philbrick, recounts the mystery surrounding the sinking of the whaleship Essex in the South Pacific. The ordeal of the whaleship Essex was an event as mythic in the nineteenth century as the sinking of the Titanic was in the twentieth. In 1819, the 238-ton Essex set sail from Nantucket on a routine voyage for whales. Fifteen months later, the unthinkable happened: in the farthest reaches of the South...
    265 Words | 1 Page
  • Science in Daily Life - 2421 Words
    [pic]The largest creature ever known to have existed on Earth is the present-day blue whale. The largest dinosaur attained a length of about 22 m and weighed about 36 tons. Today’s blue whale is even larger than its ancestors, and may reach a total length of 33 m and a weight of 145 tons. This giant animal is placid and shy. On the ocean surface, its normal cruising speed is about 12 knots, but it is capable of attaining 20 knots in short bursts. The maximum reported depth reached by the...
    2,421 Words | 11 Pages
  • makah whaling - 351 Words
    Hunting whales have been an important part of the culture and survival of the Makah tribe for 1500 years. The Makah claim that that their right to hunt and harvest whales is secured in the treaty of Neah Bay, signed in 1855 by the US. Government. Many Makah feel that their health problems result in some degree, to the loss of their traditional diet of seafood and marine mammal meat. However the American society admires whales as remarkable mammals. Many people are concerned for their suffering...
    351 Words | 1 Page
  • Stakeholder Analysis Sea Shepherd
    1.) The key issue here is whaling and whether or not it is something that needs to happen in this day and age. There are many stakeholders that come to mind in the whaling debate. In order to go more in depth with the analysis, I am going to focus on the grindadráp, also known as the grind, in the Faroe Islands. The Grind happens is that during the summer, the Faroese people surround pilot whales with a semicircle of boats, then they drive these whales to shore where the hunters wait to kill...
    1,245 Words | 3 Pages
  • Synthesis Essay - 440 Words
    Scale Size Analysis What’s it like to be as small as a fly? What’s it like to be as big as an elephant? In a matter of scale, the perspective of life differs dramatically between the large and the small. The things we see in nature every day, sometimes it makes me think we live in a strange world. The similarities between “Joyas Volardores” and “A Matter of Scale” are that they both go in depth with nature. In “Joyas Volardores,” Doyle talks about the heart of a hummingbird and a blue...
    440 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Causes and Effects of Whaling - 719 Words
    The Causes and Effects of Whaling 1 The Causes and Effects of Whaling Whale is the current name for diverse marine mammals of the order Cetacea, having the general shape of a fish with forelimbs modified as fins, a tail with level flukes, and one or two blowholes on top of the head. (“Whale”, 2010). Whaling dates back to prehistoric times, but it became an important industry in the nineteenth century. Whales have been hunted for meat or made into lighting oil. Until the international...
    719 Words | 3 Pages
  • Do We Need All “Cultural Heritage”
    Do We Need All “Cultural Heritage”? As we know, the growth rate of whale is quite low. But there are still a few countries have whale hunting. For example: Japan and Norway. If you note the news about this, you must had seen that Japan and Norway hunted lots of whale every year. And the numbers of Japan’s whale hunting are almost thousand a year. On the other hand, bullfighting is a very popular activity in Spain. You can find that there have bullfighting in Spain everyday and every...
    1,610 Words | 4 Pages
  • Business Law - 557 Words
    HA2022 Business Law Tri 1, 2011 QUESTION 1 Sue Fairbairn is 35 years old. She is a commercial boat skipper who works for Whale Watching. She has held a commercial skipper’s licence for 15 years and is considered to be a very experienced whale watching skipper. To ensure she is always at the peak of her health she has annual medical examinations, which are conducted by her local doctor. Last week she was booked to take a group of tourists on a whale watching cruise leaving from Byron Bay...
    557 Words | 2 Pages
  • Earthlings Reaction Paper - 633 Words
    It never ceases to amaze me how incredibly selfish the human race is. It’s all about what we want, what we “need”, what’s the hot new thing that we simply must have—no matter who or what may be exploited in the process. after that scene where some garbage men in Mexico throwing a still-living, struggling stray dog into the back of a garbage truck and then compacting it, The horrifying and the gruesome images that were shown in the film made me want to run out of the auditorium. Dolphins...
    633 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ronnie RamirezWCA5 - 527 Words
    Ronnie Ramirez Thinking and Doing Ethics PHI-210RS-CL03 Professor Jean Suplizio, Ph.D. 04/05/15 Morality or Tradition The Makah tribe have long been hunters of whales. The hunting dates back 2000 years and initial stopped in the 1920's due to a significant decrease in the Gray Whale population. The tribe has three significant groups comprised of the elders, the proponents of hunting and the younger members, lacking in traditional ways. A majority of the tribe now wants to regenerate the...
    527 Words | 2 Pages
  • Moby Dick Summer Reading
    Taylor Corey Mr. David Hatcher Honors English III 4 August 2014 Chapter One Reflection Chapter one introduces Ishmael, who seems to me like a very sad person. He loves to go out to sea to get his mind off of everything. He says “whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth; whenever it is a damp, drizzly November in my soul…” which indicates that he is sad and not happy with himself. He almost seems like he has a suicidal side to him. He is a very simple minded person who does not care...
    2,528 Words | 7 Pages
  • Speech Outline - 718 Words
    Sample Outline for Object Speech 1Student’s Name: Title: A Whale of a Life Purpose: To inform my audience about my object and myself. Thesis Statement: My object reveals pieces of who I am. Preview: This notebook reveals one of my obsessions, one of my ambitions, and one of my passions. Type of Organization: Categorical Date: Introduction: I. Growing up we all had a movie that made an impact on our lives. For me that movie was Free Willy. A. The story of a...
    718 Words | 3 Pages
  • Analysis of Literature Review - 3228 Words
    Literature Reviews What this handout is about This handout will explain what a literature review is and offer insights into the form and construction of a literature review in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Introduction OK. You've got to write a literature review. You dust off a novel and a book of poetry, settle down in your chair, and get ready to issue a "thumbs up" or "thumbs down" as you leaf through the pages. "Literature review" done. Right? Wrong! The "literature"...
    3,228 Words | 9 Pages
  • The Blinding Color of Blood: The constraints of Geography in Taiji, Japan
    The Blinding Color of Blood: The constraints of Geography The modern whaling debate is in no doubt a strenuous one. Whaling in itself has been around since as far back as 6000BC and countries such as Japan and Norway have developed into nations which revolve around a market for such cetaceans as whales and dolphins. In fact, in Taiji, a small town on the southern shores of Japan, over thirty percent of their annual economy is generated from a market oriented around whales and dolphins...
    4,289 Words | 12 Pages
  • From the Explorer's Daughter - 489 Words
    How does Kari Herbert convince the readers for the necessity of hunting whales in the arctic region? You should comment on: 1=the geographical and living conditions of the native people. 2=the use of argumentative language. 3=the language If people in the arctic region won't eat what they have, i.e. whales, then what will they eat? Should they think of saving the extinct animals or saving their own lives? This is the argument stated by Kari Herbert and she has indeed confused and convinced the...
    489 Words | 2 Pages
  • Endangered Species - 640 Words
    Endangered Species Endangered species are living things whose population is so reduced that they are threatened with extinction. Thousands of species are included in this category. The International Union for the Conservation of nature and Natural Resources publishes a list of threatened mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and (many people do not consider them) plants .CAUSES OF EXTINCTION Millions of years before humans, extinction of living things was linked to geological and climate, the...
    640 Words | 2 Pages
  • Music Healer - 1150 Words
    Even before King David, the kings of old must have employed musicians to soothe and heal them during times of stress and illness. The healing power of music has been expressed throughout the centuries, from the strumming of ancient harps and flutes, to the pure voice sung in chants and folk songs. Music has no bounds when it creates the sounds to heal and mellow the soul. It's legacy survives every generation through history and is expressed through the hearts and deeper feelings in the...
    1,150 Words | 3 Pages
  • Biodiversity of the Animal Kingdom - 1082 Words
    Biodiversity of the Animal Kingdom Avis Wilson Axia College of University of Phoenix The two mammals I picked to research are the Blue Whale and the Skunk. I will describe what characteristics they share, and some of their differences. I will also list a couple more animals considered to be mammals. Three things all mammals have in common are: the ear contains three middle ear bones, at some point in life they all have hair, and they all have mammary glands. As I will state below they...
    1,082 Words | 2 Pages
  • Japanese Castles - 474 Words
    Whale Rider Questions 1.The movie starts underwater, we can hear whale noises and haunting music. 2.The baby is named after the first chief/whale rider Paikea. 3.The mother and twin brother die. 4. The new chief must be male. 5. The argument is about what Porourangi should do next, stay or leave? They also fought about Pai’s name. 6. The 3 ladies were smoking. According to Pai “Maori women need to protect their child bearing properties” so they should stop. 7. Pai’s Father. 8.A boy...
    474 Words | 2 Pages
  • Whaling Debate - 699 Words
    Debating Speech – 1st speaker That the Australian Government should protect anti-whaling protesters who forcibly disrupt whaling ships Hello adjudicator, negative team and time keeper. I am… the first speaker of the Affirmative team. I will cover the points of whaling, and the legalities in Australia that surround it. We the Affirmative team define the topic as: The Australian Government should protect and safeguard the anti-whaling protesters who’s main objective is to stop the...
    699 Words | 3 Pages
  • Pointing and Naming - 10955 Words
    This article was downloaded by: [Brooke, Charlene][informa internal users] On: 18 February 2011 Access details: Access Details: [subscription number 755239602] Publisher Routledge Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 3741 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information:...
    10,955 Words | 39 Pages
  • Essay Responding to Kim Scott's Novel "That Deadman Dance".
    Question 1: Rite Wail (1).The novel is about writing, about rites, about whaling- especially right whaling-and about wailing. Explore the ways in which these two words at the start of the novel encapsulate the world of the novel as a whole. Try to focus your answer on the language of three or four key passages in the novel. “That Deadman dance” by Kim Scott is a powerful yet delicate interpretation of words. The reader is presented with two distinct and memorable words in the prologue...
    1,768 Words | 6 Pages
  • Dolphins - 909 Words
    Kill a whale prove be an adult? On the contrary I think that it is an immaturity act and crazy act, the people in Denmark kill 1.000 of dolphins for year. The 0,1 % of the species of Calderon dolphin is killed annually. This is brutal act and I think that need be stopped, because the dolphins are killed an the species will be in extinction. This brutal bloody slaughter takes place in the Faroe Islands, which belong to Denmark. To initiate into adulthood it is mandatory to kill a...
    909 Words | 3 Pages
  • Animal Welfare Charity - 419 Words
    RSPCA Since 1824 The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was founded. It has been up and running since. The men at the time, who were creating this aid organization, knew that it was the world’s first animal welfare charity. The organisation was actually established in a coffee shop in London. There first focus was ‘Pit Ponies’ who were ponies that worked in the coal mines. Workers were not keen on fashion especially when it was to do with animals. In 1898, Venezuela (South...
    419 Words | 2 Pages
  • In the Heart of the Sea - 1473 Words
    In the Heart of the Sea Jason Barker In the novel “In the heart of the Sea” Nathaniel Philbrick introduces the reader to Nantucket Island located in the east coast. He establishes the importance of the whaling industry in relation to the island. Philbrick does an incredible job of telling the story of 20 regular men doing their jobs whaling. They set sail on a renewed ship called the Essex. The Essex took a beating from a storm before it finally met its match an angered sperm whale. The...
    1,473 Words | 4 Pages