Acoustic Neuroma

Topics: Brain, Cerebellum, Neurology Pages: 4 (974 words) Published: February 12, 2015
Eldon Fobbs 
Burrell 
Honors Anatomy Physiology 
Fall Semester 
 
 
 
  
  
 
Acoustic Neuroma. Something I’ve never heard of, you probably have. The  eighth cranial nerve, which will be referred to as the auditory nerve for simplicity, consists of  the cochlear and vestibular divisions. These two divisions, running from the inner ear to the  brain, are responsible for transmitting information about hearing and maintaining balance,  respectively. When the Schwann cells (used to keep peripheral nerve fibers alive) that  surround the vestibular division grow at an abnormal rate inside if the ear canal, you’ve got  yourself a case of acoustic neuroma. 

 

 

The resulting tumor from the uncontrolled growth of cells is benign, meaning 

that it isn’t cancerous (which would be malignant). Benign tumors grow only in one spot, do  not spread or “invade” other parts of your body, and do not usually grow back after treatment.  Despite their lack of a cancerous nature, they are still dangerous because of their potential to  grow and press upon viral organs, like the brain. 

 

The tumors associated with acoustic neuroma normally grow slowly, and 

because of this they symptoms associated with them develop gradually and can easily be  over looked. The tumor presses against the auditory nerve, causing dizziness, hearing loss,  and a “ringing in the ears” (tinnitus).  If the tumor continues to grow and is allowed to get large  enough, it will eventually press upon the nearby facial nerve and cause facial paralysis or  tingling. The real danger of acoustic neuroma tumors is when they get even larger and press  upon brain structures, particularly ones that control vital body functions. Other common 

symptoms of acoustic neuroma include problems with balance, vertigo, taste changes,  difficulty swallowing and hoarseness, and confusion. 
 

There are two causes of acoustic neuroma: a sporadic form and the NF2 ...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • acoustic Essay
  • Sound Acoustics Essay
  • Sound and Acoustic Essay
  • Sound Waves and Room Acoustics Essay
  • Essay about Architectural Acoustics: An Overview
  • Acoustic Theory and Synthesis Essay
  • Shallow-Water Acoustics and Relevant Physics Essay
  • Opera House Acoustics Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free